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09 Jun 2019 14:58
The Worst Dry Dog Foods 
photoSEVEN BAD DRY DOG FOODS TO AVOID

BENEFUL BY PURINA
While Beneful by Purina does contain chicken as a protein, it's also full of corn, soy, and wheat. These ingredients can cause significant digestive and health issues over time.
It also has questionable chicken and poultry by-product. In terms of chemicals, the formula contains numerous artificial dyes.

KIBBLES N BITS
Again, corn is listed as the first ingredient. There's also beef and bone meal, soybean meal, and wheat flour. It's noticeably absent from any natural muscle meat sources.
In addition, the formula contains numerous synthetic dyes and hydrochloric acid or preservation.

IAMS DOG FOOD
While chicken is the main source of protein for Iams, it also contains chicken by-product meal. It also includes corn meal and whole grain sorghum.
Another potentially dangerous ingredient used in the formula is dried beat pulp. It's used as a sugar filler and can cause weight gain.

PURINA DOG CHOW
The main ingredient in Dog Chow is whole grain corn. There's also unfavorable poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, whole grain wheat, and soybean meal.
Purina also used four different dyes to achieve the color. As a whole, the dry dog food's use of corn, grains, and dyes make it a bad choice for pups.

MUENSTER NATURAL ADULT DOG FOOD
This dog food formula is natural, but that doesn't mean that its necessarily good. The main protein source is chicken meal rather than wholesome chicken.
There's also ground corn, wheat, corn gluten meal, brown rice, and grain sorghum. It also contains sugary beet pulp and citric acid. In all, the formula can cause weight gain, digestive issues, and more.

OL ROY BY WALMART
This dry dog food doesn't contain any healthy protein sources. Instead, it's filled with ground corn, soybean meal, ground wheat, and meat meal.
Corn is listed as the first ingredient, which means that it has the highest concentration. Citric acid is also used as a preservative, which can cause tooth and digestive issues.

PEDIGREE ADULT COMPLETE NUTRITION DRY DOG FOOD
The closest thing to a natural protein in Pedigree is chicken by-product meal. This ingredient isn't great and can come from unwanted leftovers from a variety of sources.
Ground whole corn and corn gluten meal are also used. A variety of synthetic colors are also utilized, making this formula an unhealthy choice all around.

HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD DRY DOG FOOD
With the wide variety of dry dog foods on the market, owners can easily find an option that's healthy and beneficial to their dog. Dry dog food is relatively inexpensive, especially when bought in bulk, and can be stored pretty easily.

Not all dog foods are made the same. To avoid a potentially dangerous formula, it's important to examine the ingredients and packaging. This will ensure that the canine companion is getting the nutrition and protein they need.

UNDERSTANDING THE LABEL
One of the easiest ways to pick a quality dry dog food is by looking at the label and choosing an option that has the "Balanced and Complete" phrase. To legally print this on the packaging, manufacturers have to follow government-enforced standards of quality.

This government regulation ensures that the formula contains all the necessary nutritional standards to live a healthy life. It also helps to separate good dog food from regular treats and mystery foods.

Another thing to look out for is a "Stated Protein Content" chart. This chart will provide more information about the level of protein contained within the formula. For dogs, protein is key. They need high levels of protein to develop properly. To choose the best option, owners should go with a protein percentage that fits the particular breed.

To read the whole article of How Bad Are They? Go to dailydogstuff.com


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09 Jun 2019 14:57
The Worst Dry Dog Foods 
photoSEVEN BAD DRY DOG FOODS TO AVOID

BENEFUL BY PURINA
While Beneful by Purina does contain chicken as a protein, it's also full of corn, soy, and wheat. These ingredients can cause significant digestive and health issues over time.
It also has questionable chicken and poultry by-product. In terms of chemicals, the formula contains numerous artificial dyes.

KIBBLES N BITS
Again, corn is listed as the first ingredient. There's also beef and bone meal, soybean meal, and wheat flour. It's noticeably absent from any natural muscle meat sources.
In addition, the formula contains numerous synthetic dyes and hydrochloric acid or preservation.

IAMS DOG FOOD
While chicken is the main source of protein for Iams, it also contains chicken by-product meal. It also includes corn meal and whole grain sorghum.
Another potentially dangerous ingredient used in the formula is dried beat pulp. It's used as a sugar filler and can cause weight gain.

PURINA DOG CHOW
The main ingredient in Dog Chow is whole grain corn. There's also unfavorable poultry by-product meal, meat and bone meal, whole grain wheat, and soybean meal.
Purina also used four different dyes to achieve the color. As a whole, the dry dog food's use of corn, grains, and dyes make it a bad choice for pups.

Muenster Natural Adult Dog Food
This dog food formula is natural, but that doesn't mean that its necessarily good. The main protein source is chicken meal rather than wholesome chicken.
There's also ground corn, wheat, corn gluten meal, brown rice, and grain sorghum. It also contains sugary beet pulp and citric acid. In all, the formula can cause weight gain, digestive issues, and more.

OL ROY BY WALMART
This dry dog food doesn't contain any healthy protein sources. Instead, it's filled with ground corn, soybean meal, ground wheat, and meat meal.
Corn is listed as the first ingredient, which means that it has the highest concentration. Citric acid is also used as a preservative, which can cause tooth and digestive issues.

PEDIGREE ADULT COMPLETE NUTRITION DRY DOG FOOD
The closest thing to a natural protein in Pedigree is chicken by-product meal. This ingredient isn't great and can come from unwanted leftovers from a variety of sources.
Ground whole corn and corn gluten meal are also used. A variety of synthetic colors are also utilized, making this formula an unhealthy choice all around.

HOW TO CHOOSE A GOOD DRY DOG FOOD
With the wide variety of dry dog foods on the market, owners can easily find an option that's healthy and beneficial to their dog. Dry dog food is relatively inexpensive, especially when bought in bulk, and can be stored pretty easily.

Not all dog foods are made the same. To avoid a potentially dangerous formula, it's important to examine the ingredients and packaging. This will ensure that the canine companion is getting the nutrition and protein they need.

Understanding the LabelOne of the easiest ways to pick a quality dry dog food is by looking at the label and choosing an option that has the "Balanced and Complete" phrase. To legally print this on the packaging, manufacturers have to follow government-enforced standards of quality.

This government regulation ensures that the formula contains all the necessary nutritional standards to live a healthy life. It also helps to separate good dog food from regular treats and mystery foods.

Another thing to look out for is a "Stated Protein Content" chart. This chart will provide more information about the level of protein contained within the formula. For dogs, protein is key. They need high levels of protein to develop properly. To choose the best option, owners should go with a protein percentage that fits the particular breed.

To read the whole article of How Bad Are They? Go to dailydogstuff.com


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29 May 2019 13:14
Healthy Doggie Ice Cream 
photoThis Doggie Ice Cream Recipe is very easy with only three ingredients. I tried it on Mitzi and Max. They love, love, love it...

3 very ripe bananas
32 ounce pkg. of plain yogurt
1 cup creamy peanut butter

Blend well. Pour mixture into Ice trays and freeze.


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08 May 2019 09:22
Walmart will see your furry friend now 
photo> World's biggest retailer launches online pet pharmacy and expands its in-store veterinary clinics.
> Americans will spend $75 billion on their pets this year, industry group estimates.
> Millennials may have student debt, but they still spend as much as $1,285 a year on their dogs.

It's well known that millennials are struggling with student debt, but those who own pets aren't skimping when it comes to feeding and caring for their four-footed family members. So says Walmart, which on Tuesday announced it's looking to tap into that lucrative younger market by launching an online pet pharmacy and in-store veterinary clinics.

Walmart said its site now offers discounted prescriptions from more than 300 brands for dogs, cats, horses and livestock.
Walmart already operates 21 veterinary clinics in six states, and will open nine more in Texas later this month and in June in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. The retailer in 12 months will have 100 clinics running where pet owners can bring their animals to be vaccinated or examined for minor illnesses, it said.

The retailer has also expanded its online assortment to include more organic and grain-free pet food options, including a private-label brand with ingredients such as farm-raised chicken.

The moves have Walmart competing with PetSmart's online business, Chewy.com, which also has an online pharmacy. Chewy.com recently filed papers with regulators to get ready for an initial public offering.
Millennial dog owners spend as much as $1,285 a year on their four-footed friends, with the majority of that going toward vet care and vaccinations, food and supplies, Walmart said in a blog post, which cited TD Ameritrade for the estimate.
Americans are pampering their pets more than ever, and will spend $75 billion on their animals this year, the American Pet Product Association estimates.


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07 May 2019 14:03
Pets Help Older Adults Cope With Health Issues 
Pets help older adults cope with mental and physical health issues, according to a new national poll. But pets can also bring concerns, and some people may even put their animals' needs ahead of their own health, the poll finds. Three-quarters of pet owners aged 50 to 80 say their animals reduce their stress and give them a sense of purpose. But 18 percent also said having one puts a strain on their budget.

Pet Positives

Companionship and social connection were positive side effects of pet ownership for many poll respondents.

In fact, more than half of those who owned pets said they did so specifically to have a companion -- and a slightly higher percentage said their pets sleep in bed with them. Sixty-five percent of pet owners said having a pet helps connect them to other people, too.

"Relationships with pets tend to be less complicated than those with humans, and pets are often a source of great enjoyment," says Mary Janevic, Ph.D., M.P.H., an assistant research scientist at the U-M School of Public Health who helped design the poll. "They also provide older adults with a sense of being needed and loved."

Pet Problems

Other concerns about pet ownership emerged in the poll results. More than half of pet owners said that having a pet also made it difficult to travel or enjoy activities outside the home.

And one in six said that they put their pet's needs ahead of their own health needs -- a figure that was closer to one in four among those with health issues.

"Later life is often a time when people have more freedom to travel, and a long list of things they want to do with their free time, and sometimes having a pet can get in the way,"says Janevic. "For people living on a fixed income, expenses related to health care for pets, and especially pets that have chronic health issues, can be a struggle. Older adults can also develop health problems or disabilities that make pet care difficult."

A full report of the findings and methodology is available at www.healthyagingpoll.org , along with past National Poll on Healthy Aging reports.

This article has been shortened to fit our format. You can read the full article on line at sciencedaily.com .


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16 Jan 2019 15:41
DOG FOOD RECALL 
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is warning pet owners not to feed a specific lot of Answers brand dog food after Salmonella was discovered in the food.
A+ Answers Straight Beef Formula for Dogs
Lot Code: 2018
Best Use By Date: 02/08/20


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15 Jan 2019 11:37
Dangerous Foods for Dogs 
photoXylitol
Candy, gum, toothpaste, baked goods, and some diet foods are sweetened with xylitol. It can cause your dog's blood sugar to drop and can also cause liver failure. Early symptoms include vomiting, lethargy, and coordination problems. Eventually, your dog may have seizures. Liver failure can happen within just a few days.

Avocado
Is a treat from the table OK for your dog? That depends on what it is. Avocados, for example, have something called persin. It’s fine for people who aren't allergic to it. But too much might cause vomiting or diarrhea in dogs. If you grow avocados at home, keep your dog away from the plants. Persin is in the leaves, seed, and bark, as well as the fruit. Also, the avocado seed can become stuck in the intestines or stomach, and obstruction could be fatal.

Alcohol
Alcohol has the same effect on a dog’s liver and brain that it has on people. But it takes a lot less to hurt your dog. Just a little beer, liquor, wine, or food with alcohol can be bad. It can cause vomiting, diarrhea, coordination problems, breathing problems, coma, even death. And the smaller your dog, the worse it can be.

Onions and Garlic
Keep onions and garlic -- powdered, raw, cooked, or dehydrated -- away from your dog. They can kill his red blood cells, causing anemia. That's even the onion powder in some baby food. A rare small dose is probably OK. But eating a lot just once can cause poisoning. Look for signs like weakness, vomiting, and breathing problems.

Coffee, Tea, and Other Caffeine
Give your dog toys if you want him to be perky. Caffeine can be fatal. Watch out for coffee and tea, even the beans and the grounds. Keep your dog away from cocoa, chocolate, colas, and energy drinks. Caffeine is also in some cold medicines and pain killers. Think your dog had caffeine? Get your dog to the vet as soon as possible.

Grapes and Raisins
There are better treats to give your dog. Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure in dogs. And just a small amount can make a dog sick. Vomiting over and over is an early sign. Within a day, your dog will get sluggish and depressed.

Milk and Other Dairy Products
On a hot day, it may be tempting to share your ice cream with your dog. Instead, give her some cold water. Milk and milk-based products can cause diarrhea and other digestive problems for your pup. They can also trigger food allergies, which can cause her to itch.

Macadamia Nuts
Keep your dog away from macadamia nuts and foods that have macadamia nuts in them. Just six raw or roasted macadamia nuts can make a dog sick. Look for symptoms like muscle shakes, vomiting, high temperature, and weakness in his back legs. Eating chocolate with the nuts will make symptoms worse, maybe even leading to death.

Chocolate
Most people know that chocolate is bad for dogs. The problem in chocolate is theobromine. It's in all kinds of chocolate, even white chocolate. The most dangerous types are dark chocolate and unsweetened baking chocolate. Chocolate can cause a dog to vomit and have diarrhea. It can also cause heart problems, tremors, seizures, and death.

Fat Trimmings and Bones
Fat trimmed from meat, both cooked and uncooked, can cause pancreatitis in dogs. And, even though it seems natural to give a dog a bone, she can choke on it. Bones can also splinter and block or cause cuts in your dog's digestive system.

Persimmons, Peaches, and Plums
The problem with these fruits is the seeds or pits. Seeds from persimmons can cause problems in a dog's small intestine. They can also block his intestines. That can also happen if a dog eats the pit from a peach or plum. Peach and plum pits also have cyanide, which is poisonous to people and dogs. People know not to eat them. Dogs don't.

Raw Eggs
Some people feed their dogs a "raw diet" that includes uncooked eggs. But the major veterinary medical associations don't think that's a good idea. There's the chance of food poisoning from bacteria like salmonella or E. coli. Talk to your vet if you have questions.

Raw Meat and Fish
Like raw eggs, raw meat and fish can have bacteria that causes food poisoning. Some fish such as salmon, trout, shad, or sturgeon can also have a parasite that causes "fish disease" or "salmon poisoning disease." It's treatable, but get help right away. The first signs are vomiting, fever, and big lymph nodes. Fully cook the fish to kill the parasite.

Salt
It’s not a good idea to share salty foods like chips or pretzels with your dog. Eating too much salt can make your dog seriously thirsty. That means a lot of trips to the fire hydrant and it could lead to sodium ion poisoning. Symptoms of too much salt include vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, high temperature, and seizures. It may even cause death.

Sugary Foods and Drinks
Too much sugar can do the same thing to dogs that it does to people. It can make your dog overweight and cause problems with her teeth. It can even lead to diabetes.

Yeast Dough
Before it’s baked, bread dough needs to rise. And, that’s exactly what it would do in your dog’s stomach if he ate it. As it swells inside, the dough can stretch your dog’s abdomen and cause a lot of pain. Also, when the yeast ferments the dough to make it rise, it makes alcohol that can lead to alcohol poisoning.

Your Medicine
Dogs shouldn't take people medicine. It's can make them very sick. Just as you do for your kids, keep all medicines out of your dog’s reach. And, never give your dog any over-the-counter medicine unless your vet tells you to. Ingredients such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen are common in pain relievers and cold medicine. And, they can be deadly for your dog.

Kitchen Pantry: No Dogs Allowed
Many other things often found on kitchen shelves can hurt your dog. Baking powder and baking soda are both highly toxic. So are nutmeg and other spices. Keep food high enough to be out of your dog’s reach and keep pantry doors closed.

What Dogs Can Eat
You can make sure your dog has a healthy, well-balanced diet by asking your vet to suggest a quality dog food. But that doesn't mean you can't sometimes give your dog people food as a special treat. Only give him a little. Be sure the foods are cooked, pure, and not fatty or heavily seasoned. Here are some ideas.

Safe: Lean Meats
Most dogs are fine eating lean cuts of meat that have been cooked well. Take off all visible fat -- including the skin on poultry. Be sure that there are no bones in the meat before you give it to your dog.

Safe: Some Fresh Fruits
Slices of apples, oranges, bananas, and watermelon make tasty treats for your dog. Take out any seeds first. Seeds, stems, and leaves can cause serious problems.

Safe: Some Vegetables
Your dog can have a healthy snack of carrot sticks, green beans, cucumber slices, or zucchini slices. Even a plain baked potato is OK. Don't let your dog eat any raw potatoes or any potato plants from your pantry or garden.

Safe: Cooked White Rice and Pasta
Dogs can eat plain white rice or pasta after it’s cooked. And, a serving of plain white rice with some boiled chicken can sometimes make your dog feel better when she's having stomach problems.


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15 Jan 2019 11:15
How Owning a Dog Can Improve Your Health 
photoWhen illness or injury strikes, the road to recovery is often paved with medications and therapies, in addition to a healthy diet, physical activity and plenty of TLC. Healing is serious business, and you must be kind to your body when it needs you most. But what helps us heal is not always sold over-the-counter, nor is it always available in the produce aisle. Sometimes it is asleep at the foot of the bed, begging for a treat, licking your face or running circles around your yard. I'm speaking, of course, about the power of dogs.

Simply put, having a dog changes your life. These furry co-dependents fill our lives with meaning, and can teach us about love, loyalty and companionship. Despite their sometimes frenetic nature, dogs have a particular serenity about them. They are keenly in tune with human emotion at times of loss, strife, illness or other challenges, and may experience some of these same profound feelings themselves. Animal behaviorists note that dogs "mourn" in their own way, sleeping more, eating less and moving slower after long periods of time away from those they are bonded to, human or canine. And anyone lucky enough to love a dog can tell you about their profound ability not only to sympathize, but to help heal; it is no coincidence that dogs are brought into hospitals and rehabilitation centers to make people feel better, physically and spiritually.

People love cats and fish, but for me, dogs have always been the thing. And as it turns out, being a "dog person" has restorative benefits not unlike those of adhering to an organic diet and regular exercise routine. Last year, a study found that owning a pet – especially a dog – improved cardiovascular health by keeping people active. It also reduced stress responses in the body, and lowered blood pressure, cholesterol levels and weight.

Other research has suggested that petting a dog makes us – and the dog – feel better, because it causes the body to release the affection-inducing hormone oxytocin. In addition to visiting health care facilities, specially trained dogs also assist the disabled with necessary tasks, can alert diabetics to low or high blood sugar levels and can help break down barriers with children on the autism spectrum. Canines are uniquely qualified to connect with other species. In fact, researchers at Duke University’s Canine Cognition Center found that dogs appear to be the only species unafraid of strangers; by contrast, they adore them.

Taking care of a dog can be challenging at times, and losing a pet is pure, unadulterated heartbreak. But the positives of letting a dog into your life far outweigh any potential negatives. I have witnessed time and again at the Imus Ranch how caring for an animal – whether a horse, dog, chicken or cow – can bring people back to life. It allows children and adults battling illness to put that all aside, if only for a few minutes, to take care of another. While this is not a dog’s intended purpose, it is a happy byproduct – just one of many.

I teach a lot about the importance of eating organic foods, avoiding chemical exposures, and exercising to achieve or regain health. Above all of those factors, however, I place a good sense of humor, fantastic music - and dogs. Any and all will do. As the season turns and we emerge from winter’s doldrums, laugh a little, turn up the volume and allow some four-legged joy to enter your life.


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09 Oct 2018 08:46
Shedding Concerns 
photoSometimes it seems like you can make a second dog from what you brush off your dog's coat.

Some dogs are big shedders, and sometimes they shed even more than usual. No owner relishes constantly sweeping up a home full of dog hair "tumbleweed," but many are also worried it's a sign of ill health when the shedding ramps up out of nowhere; they raise the issue with us frequently. Is it the sign of a problem?

If your dog retains a normal coat and doesn't show patches of baldness, his shedding problem simply means you need to get the Swiffer out more. He is fine, even if he has been shedding what seems to be somewhat more than usual.

Granted, veterinary researchers do not know why a healthy dog might shed more one year than another. Hormone secretions play into it, along with other circulating chemicals in a dog's body, and even his stress level, and those could all vary from year to year. But these variations over time do not indicate abnormalities.

One thing to be aware of is that dogs' hair often tends to grow in more and shed less as the summer wears on, and die and shed more as the winter wears on. That might seem counterintuitive, because you'd expect a dog's hair to fall out as the summer gets hotter and hotter and to grow in as the weather gets colder and colder. But it's about the amount of daylight. The shortest day of the year is December 21st. After that, as the days lengthen, a dog starts to shed a little more in preparation for the warm weather ahead, even though it is still the dead of winter.

Likewise, the longest day of the year is June 21st. As the days shorten after that, a dog might be a little less likely to lose hair as his body prepares for the cold weather coming, even though it might still be July or August. In other words, it’s all about the season to come, not the season we’re in. But it all works out. In any given dog, some follicles are always actively growing, while others are slowing down and others still, are in a non-active phase. The mosaic pattern is what insures that hair is all over the dog's body at all times.

What can you do about it to keep your house cleaner? Just as the catch-phrase in real estate is "location, location, location," with dogs and their shedding it’s "brush, brush, brush" (and put the removed hair right in the trash). Remember, dead hairs are not going to go down the drain in the shower, like they do for you. You have to actively remove them so they don’t end up all over your rugs, hardwood floors, furniture, clothing, and car seats. Not only will brushing your dog every single day keep your home neater (some dogs don't even mind being vacuumed with a wand), it will also assuage your fear that something is wrong. If you assiduously brush every day, remove a lot of hair, and see that your dog's coat is still full, you will not feel worried that things are amiss with his health.

If all the hair still bothers you even though you always brush, there are two things to consider for your next dog:

1. Dogs with a top coat and an undercoat, like German shepherds, may be among the biggest shedders. Their two different types of hair mean more of their hair is in active growth at any given time, and more dead hairs are being shed.

2. Dogs with curly hair, like poodles and Portuguese water dogs, have the most hair follicles in the active growing phase, relatively speaking. Translation: While they don't keep all of their hair 100 percent of the time, they don't shed as much as straight-haired breeds.

These are generalities, of course. With hundreds of breeds of dogs, there are all kinds of variations. But no matter how you cut it, life with a dog means life with hair. The bright side: all that hair is part of what makes them so adorable.


Provided by Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care
Excerpted from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University


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19 Sep 2018 10:41
Tips For Living With A Blind Or Visually Impaired Pet 
Help your vision-impaired pet navigate her environment by:

* Keeping her/his water and food in the same location (and for cats, not moving litter boxes)
* Decluttering and not rearranging furniture
* Sticking to a routine
* Training your pet to rely on voice commands and warnings
* Considering crate training or gates to minimize exposure to hazards
* Speaking to your pet before touching her/him
* Covering hardwood floors and uncarpeted stairs with rugs or runners
* Stimulating her/his other senses through different scents, textures, and sounds

For more tips plus some inspirational stories, visit Blindtails.

By Andrea Vardaro Tucker, ELS


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10 Jun 2018 10:48
Dealing with Pet Loss 
Association for Pet Loss and Bereavement
A non-profit organization that offers free online pet loss support chat rooms to pet parents that have lost a beloved pet. All of the chats are moderated by trained pet loss counselors. In addition, they offer support and training for those working in the Veterinary/Animal Care professions. They offer an online Pet Loss Counseling Certification program that leads the way in preparing counselors and others interested in helping pet parents at a very difficult time. www.aplb.org .

Center For Pet Loss Grief
Is a safe place for animal lovers to find comfort and receive a greater understanding of their pet loss grief. A resource for compassionate support when working through the grief that comes with the illness or death of a beloved animal companion. And a supportive community so no one ever has to feel alone in their journey of pet loss grief. Founded by Wendy Van de Poll a certified end of life and pet loss grief coach, animal medium and communicator, speaker and educator. She is best selling and award winning author. She has appeared on radio, podcast and TV.
centerforpetlossgrief.com

by Arlene Wong
Loving Pet Care


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08 May 2018 08:11
What To Do When You Discover You're Allergic To Your Dog 
photoChances are there are a lot of changes you can make to tamp down the allergy symptoms. Even with a curly-haired dog who hardly sheds, there's no guarantee that it will be hypoallergenic for everyone in the household.

Pop math quiz (don't worry — it's easy): Some seven out of 10 U.S. households have a dog. And one out of 10 people is allergic to dogs, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. So what are the odds that many among us are living with our allergens?

Answer: High. You can rest assured that all the people who are allergic to dogs are not crowded into the three in 10 households that are dog-less.

Not every dog owner who is allergic to her dog knows it up front. Plenty of people bring home a dog only to find their eyes watering and their throat itchy a year later. It can take that much time for the body to build up antibodies to a dog's dander — the flakes of dead skin cells that slough off and cause allergic reactions. (It's not a dog's fur that causes the problem, as many people think.)

Some people also find themselves allergic to substances in their pet's saliva, which is why they break out in hives when a dog licks them. The offending substances make their way directly onto the skin.

It's often said that dogs with non-shedding coats — usually curly-haired breeds like bichon frises and Portuguese water dogs — are hypoallergenic because they end up leaving less dander around the house. But no dog can be said to be universally hypoallergenic. In some cases, just a tiny amount of dander will get the wheezing and other symptoms going. And you can't know beforehand if the dog you bring home is going to cause you a problem (although if you are allergic to airborne substances like dust and pollen, the chances you will end up allergic to your dog are greater).

Complicating matters further is that the incidence of allergies to dogs has gone up substantially in industrialized countries like our own over the last 60 years because houses are now built more air-tight to preserve energy. There's less exchange with outside air to minimize the problem.

But you most likely do not have to give up a dog to whom you find yourself allergic (as if you would). Here are the steps to take to keep your canine squeeze in your life without suffering any (or at least as many) uncomfortable consequences.

-Go to an allergist for testing. It may not be the dog that's the problem but something on the dog. One family we know brought home a lovely little sweetie pie of a pet only to find many months in that she was making them all sneeze. Upon testing, it turned out that everyone in the household was allergic not to the dog but to dust mites, which the dog carried on her.

-If you are found or suspected to be allergic to your dog, create an allergy-free zone in your house. Perhaps it should be the bedroom, where you spend about eight out of every 24 hours. Of course, closing off a room isn’t going to make it 100 percent allergen-free. The tiny molecules can certainly make their way through a closed door. But it will help.

-To the extent possible, limit fabrics. Allergens really collect in upholstery, rugs, and drapes. The less you have of them (wall-to-wall carpet is definitely harder to keep allergen-free than wood or tile floors), the fewer surfaces your dog's allergens will be able to cling to. The fabrics you do have should be steam-cleaned regularly. (And make sure your windows are fitted with washable shades.)

-Vacuum frequently — with a machine that has a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate arresting) filter or a disposable electrostatic bag. Otherwise you're spewing allergens back into the air.

-Add an air cleaner with a HEPA filter to central air conditioning and heating. This will help stop allergens from circulating throughout the house. Letting in a little fresh air daily, no matter how cold or hot outside, will help, too.

-Invest in an anti-allergen room spray. Your allergist should be able to recommend a spray that deactivates allergens.

-Wipe down walls. Just as you dust regularly, you should wipe — not just the furniture but the walls.

-Buy washable pet bedding only — and crates and other accouterments for your pet that can be cleaned easily.

-Bathe your dog once a week. In the home where everyone turned out to be allergic to dust mites, bathing the dog more frequently really cut down on the allergens she was literally carrying on her back. Just make sure you confer with your vet so that you choose a shampoo that won’t dry out your pet’s sensitive skin.

-Give your pet frequent wipe-downs. Some products are formulated to help prevent dander from building up and flaking into the environment. Again, talk to your vet about which product(s) may be appropriate.

-Brush or comb your dog every single day. Even better if you can do it outdoors. The dander hangs around on fur, so the more fur you can pull off through frequent brushing rather than let it collect around the house, the less dander that's going to hang around in your home environment.

-Wear a dust mask when you do all the cleaning and brushing. Or better yet, leave those tasks to someone in the household who is not allergic to the dog.

-Wash your hands immediately after petting your dog — particularly before you touch your face. The eyes and nose can be especially sensitive to allergens. You don't want to get the symptoms going.

-Consider reserving one set of clothes as a pet outfit. The Humane Society of the United States points out that if you do that, you can cuddle with your dog to your heart's content without contaminating your entire wardrobe.

-If necessary, consult with your allergist about medications you can take on an ongoing basis to relieve symptoms. Allergy shots work well for some people, while others come up with a system for using over-the-counter drugs with antihistamines that block the sequence of events leading to the triggering of symptoms. Still other people find that decongestants do the trick. Prescription steroids might be called for in certain instances, too.

A final thought: just as an allergic reaction to a dog can come out of nowhere, it sometimes disappears suddenly, too. The plaguing symptoms may dissipate when you think they never will.

Article Provided by Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care


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18 Apr 2018 10:34
Frosty Breath Doggie Treats 
photo1/2 Cup Coconut oil
1/2 Cup Chicken Broth (no onion)
1/2 Cup Creek Yogurt
1/2 Cup Mint
1/2 Cup Parsley

Mix chicken broth and oil in a blender. Mix until well blended. Pour in remaining ingredients. Pulse until mixed. Pour into molds and freeze.
Dogs love them!!!


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14 Nov 2017 12:08
Filling Your Dog's Prescriptions at a Human Pharmacy Might be Cheaper, But Is it Always Safe? 
Three things you need to know so you don't sacrifice safety for savings.

Gigi, a newly adopted German shepherd mix puppy, was in obvious pain. "At first she would scream out if she was bumped by another dog or if she'd jump down from the couch," says Gigi's owner, Abby Baker of Phoenix, Arizona. "It got to the point where she couldn't walk or stand by herself most of the time."

After multiple visits to a local emergency and specialty animal hospital, Gigi was eventually diagnosed with meningitis in her lumbar spine, or lower back. Because of her very young age and small size—she weighed less than 13 pounds at the time—the only appropriate form of the pain-relieving medication gabapentin was liquid, which she was prescribed. The emergency hospital didn't have the proper dose in stock, so the veterinarian recommended Ms. Baker have the prescription filled at Walgreens.

"They picked out a location with us and everything, and told us that we should be able to hand the prescription to the pharmacist and have them fill it. There shouldn't be any problem. No special instructions," Ms. Baker says they told her.

For the next couple of months many of Gigi's symptoms persisted, including difficulty walking and standing and general weakness. But new ones were added: diarrhea, occa-sional vomiting, and overall lethargy. She now had low blood sugar, too. Why didn't become clear until one day during a routine appointment with a veterinary neurologist.

"We were describing how we were getting the gabapentin prescription filled," Ms. Baker explains, "when the doctor mentioned that we should be careful because human pharmacies can mix or flavor gabapentin with xylitol."

Xylitol, a naturally occurring substance, is often used as a sugar substitute, or sweetener. While fine for people, it is toxic to dogs and can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), gastrointestinal upset, seizures, liver failure, and even death. No wonder Gigi was now vomiting and lethargic.

Ms. Baker immediately began having Gigi's prescription filled at a different pharmacy and compounded with a different sweetener. The animal hospital ran blood tests at no charge, and it was determined that Gigi's xylitol exposure had caused no detectable damage to her liver or other organs. But her veterinarian believed that it likely contributed to her chronic gastrointestinal upset, resulting in fatigue, and was also responsible for the low level of sugar (glucose) in her blood.

"We were really lucky," Ms. Baker says. "It's certainly worrying that there was that risk and we didn't even know it."

The lure of human pharmacies

It's not surprising that many dog owners fill their pets' prescriptions at human and online pharmacies, often because of price. Some also find refilling prescriptions more convenient at their local CVS or Walgreens or Rite Aid, where they might be doing other shopping, anyway.

Margot Vahrenwald, DVM, who owns Park Hill Veterinary Medical Center in Denver, Colorado, estimates that upwards of 30 percent of her clients will take written prescriptions to be filled at human or online pharmacies in order to save money.

Granted, Dr. Vahrenwald says, "sometimes we have coupons that aren't available through other pharmacies for things like heartworm preventives." But "for other medi-cations, if clients have found a cheaper option, which sometimes they definitely will, we'll give them written prescriptions. Or in some cases they'll use our online pharmacy or one of the other online pharmacies."

Dr. Vahrenwald points out that even with coupons and other price breaks, the prices of prescription medications are largely dependent on supply and demand, and most human pharmacies are able to purchase drugs in larger quantities because of greater demand; therefore, they pay less for them and pass that savings onto consumers.

"It's not just the cost of the drug" that keeps the price down, she says. "It's the cost of the ordering and the holding and the overhead associated with that drug, which every pharmacy, no matter where, has to cover with a dispensing fee and pricing," says Dr. Vahrenwald. "I always explain to owners that I'm not Walgreens. I can't stock the same volume that Walgreens dispenses in a month, and so the volume that I purchase reflects that cost."

Is the cost savings worth it? Is it safe to have a pet's prescription filled by a human or online pharmacist? It can be, but for your dog's health, and even her life, there are three tips always worth keeping in mind.

Before you hand over the prescription…

Tip 1. Drugs normally compounded for people may have substances that are toxic for dogs. Ensure the human or online pharmacy never compounds your dog's medication using xylitol or other substances possibly toxic to your pet.

Communication is key here. Tell your veterinarian that you'll be filling your dog's prescription at a human pharmacy and ask about potential ingredients that could make the medicine unsafe for your pet. Also, tell your pharmacist that your prescription is for a dog and ask if the medication will be compounded, that is, if ingredients will be mixed. If they will, learn those ingredients and then check with the vet to make sure the product is safe for dogs.

Dr. Vahrenwald would prefer a pharmacist call her with questions or concerns when filling a prescription for a dog, although she concedes that rarely happens. "It's not common that pharmacists call veterinarians," she says. "Pharmacists and pharmacy technicians are under such time pressure to fill prescriptions that there is not time to call veterinarians in addition to the calls they make to human pharmacies."

Allison Mack, senior specialist, media relations for Walgreens, says, "When it comes to filling pet prescriptions, our pharmacists may use various clinical resources, such as Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook, that are specific for pets, since animals respond differently to drug therapies than humans."

But, she adds, animal prescriptions make up a very small percentage of the prescriptions filled at Walgreens pharmacies, and the use of those resources is not required of pharmacy staff.

Note: When a medication is compounded, it's often with a sweetener to improve palatability. Not all sweeteners are dangerous for dogs. Some, like sugar and syrup, are safe for them, says Casara Andre, DVM, owner of Healthy At Home, a Denver-area network of veterinary house-call professionals.

Tip 2. There may be drug storage or chain-of-custody issues. Consider that some active ingredients are deactivated by heat and light, and not all pharmacies (especially some online pharmacies) are careful with their chain of custody.

Heartworm and flea/tick preventives are perfect examples of this, Dr. Andre says. Their active ingredients lose efficacy when exposed to heat and light.

"Did they store it appropriately?" she asks rhetorically. "When it came to you, did it sit on a truck for too long? Did it sit outside your door for too long?"

Tip 3. Be aware of potential drug reactions and interactions. Never accept drug substitutions, especially for NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) and other pain relievers. You could be courting adverse reactions in your dog. If your veterinarian prescribed a specific pain medication for your pet, use only that medication. Certainly, do not try to save money by buying an over-the-counter NSAID instead of filling the prescription. Many over-the-counter drugs are not safe for dogs and can prove a medication minefield.

Substitutions could also cause problems with other medicines your dog is taking at the same time. "The veterinarian knows what other drugs the animal is on," says Dr. Andre. "So by substituting, they may not interact appropriately. A combination might be okay for people but not for dogs, and that can get a pet owner — not to mention the pet — into a lot of trouble."

"Common NSAIDs for dogs are carprofen and meloxicam," Dr. Andre continues. "The brand name of carprofen is Rimadyl, and that's one that we've seen human pharmacies start to carry. That one, as well as any other NSAID, should never be mixed with a steroid, such as prednisone." When given concurrently, the two can compromise blood supply to vital organs, potentially leading to kidney injury and liver damage, and even perforation of the gastrointestinal tract.

Dr. Vahrenwald has had firsthand experience with a human pharmacist making a recommendation that was different from the prescription. "I had one patient end up at the emergency hospital because they got a different product than what I had actually written out," she says. "And the prescription was right there in the person's hand. But the pharmacist said, ‘Well, try this.' And it had a decongestant in it that was not agreeable to the patient."

Specifically, Dr. Vahrenwald had written a prescription for Claritin (loratidine), and the pharmacist gave the pet owner Claritin-D (loratidine + pseudoephedrine). Pseudoephed-rine is toxic to dogs and can cause restlessness, agitation, hyperactivity, tremors, increased heart rate, hypertension, hyperthermia, panting, and other, less common but serious, effects.

The takeaway

"Don't be afraid to be honest with your veterinarian if you have cost concerns," Dr. Vahrenwald says. "That will help us either change our plan or our drug ideas, or we'll work with you to try to find the best option."

For instance, if a pet owner tells Dr. Vahrenwald that price is a concern, she says she'll sometimes choose a different antibiotic or an entirely different class of antibiotics. "We can also decrease the volume dispensed when the drug is first prescribed and have the pet owner refill to spread the cost out over the course of the treatment," she offers. "Or we can provide a written prescription if it is a drug available at less cost due to increased dispensing volume at a human pharmacy."

There's no doubt that dog owners will continue to shop around for the best prices for their pets' prescription medicines. Because prices are inconsistent, it's important to keep updating your research. If you do end up at a human or online pharmacy, never hesitate to speak up and ask questions when it comes to your pet's health, keeping the above tips in mind to guide you in your line of inquiry.

Reprinted from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University
Courtesy of Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care


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01 Oct 2017 10:11
Ten Signs of Canine Cancer 
photo#1 - UNUSUAL ORDORS
While "dog breath" is common, if you notice foul odors coming from the mouth, nose or rectal area, it may be due to a tumor.
#2 - BUMPS OR LUMPS ON or UNDER THE SKIN
Get into the habit of checking your pet's skin monthly. Don't forget to check behind ears and around the face. Even if you find a very tiny lump or bump, cancer can grow very quickly. Any new lumps or bumps should not be ignored. If the bumps are bleeding or theres discharge, see a veterinarian immediately.
#3 - UNUSUAL WEIGHT LOSS
Unless you've put your pet on a diet, their weight should remain pretty consistent. Sudden weight loss is a cause for concern.
#4 - APPETITE CHANGES
If your dog has lost interest in meal times, illness is likely the cause. Many health conditions cause appetite loss, and cancer is one of them.
#5 - LETHARGY
Learn to tell the difference between a lazy dog and a lethargic one. You know your dog's personality the best. If he doesn't seem like himself and is spending more and more time sleeping, talk to your veterinarian.
#6 - RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS
Dogs can get lung cancer, and some indicators could be coughing, wheezing, or shortness of breath after very little exercise.
#7 - BEHAVIOR CHANGES
Has your normally mellow dog been snapping? Is she spending more time away from you? She could be in pain. Also pay attention to how she is walking, eating and playing. If you notice any limping or struggling - it's time to see a vet.
#8 - OPEN SORES
If your dog has an open sore or other wounds that aren't healing properly, it could be because of a larger medical issue. Time to seek a professional option.
#9 - VOMITING AND DIARRHEA
If you notice that your dog is vomiting frequently, and/or has diarrhea, you should see your veterinarian, especially if it's accompanied by any of these other symptoms. Also check your dog's abdomen for bloating and distension (stomach swelling).
#10 - PALE GUMS
Know what a healthy dog's mouth looks like so you can tell when your canine's isn't. Very pale gums could mean blood loss, and cancer is one of many illnesses associated with this symptom.

Dr. Kelly Ryan, DVM at the Animal Medical Center of Mid-American and Humane Society of Missouri.


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05 Sep 2017 09:59
HUMAN FOODS DOGS CAN AND CAN'T EAT 

YES


Apples
Bananas
Blueberries
Cantaloupe
Carrots
Cheese (in moderation)
Garlic
Chicken
Eggs
Green Beans
Honey
Kiwi
Mango
Oatmeal
Peaches
Peanut Butter
Pears
Pineapple
Potatoes (cooked skins removed)
Pumpkin
Rice
Sweet Potato
Yogurt

NO


Alcohol
Avocado
Caffeine
Chocolate
Coffee
Fat Trimmmings
Garlic
Gum
Grapes
Macadamia Nuts
Milk
Mushrooms
Pits and Seeds from fruit
Oatmeal
Potato skins and raw potatoes
Peanut Butter
Raisins
Rhubarb
Salty Foods (in large amounts)
Tea
Walnuts
Xylitol
Yeast and Dough


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22 Aug 2017 08:56
Can Kissing Your Dog Give You Gum Disease? 
Newspapers from New York to England to India have now reported that kissing your dog can transmit gum disease. News anchors have broadcasted the same information. And Googling "kissing dog gum disease" yields no fewer than a dozen pages of site after site warning against sharing a peck with your pet.

The warnings can all be traced to a study published late last year in the Archives of Oral Biology, in which Japanese researchers compared the bacteria in dogs' mouths with bacteria in their owners'. The hitch: not once in the study was kissing ever mentioned.

The Japanese scientists did scrape plaque, the filmy layer of bacterial "gunk" that clings to teeth and can lead to gum disease, from the upper left molars of both dogs and their owners — and then compared the canine and human plaque samples to see if any of the bacteria in them were the same. People in 64 families and their 66 dogs were examined altogether, with breeds ranging from Toy Poodles to Collies to Corgis and Pomeranians. The result: not only were plaque-causing bacteria normally found in people also found in their dogs, but a species of plaque-building bacteria most commonly associated with dogs' mouths was also found in a good number of their owners' mouths, even though these bacteria are "uncommon in the human oral cavity" according to the researchers.

But kissing, either by dog or person, was never associated with the bacterial exchange. It’s simply proximity that causes bacteria to make their way from one place to another. Consider that transmission of bacteria in the mouth, including oral bacteria that can cause gum disease, occurs all the time between mothers and their children by virtue of their close contact in daily life, not because they kiss each other. This was shown scientifically years ago. Thus, say the researchers, it is perfectly reasonable to postulate that bacteria make their way between dogs and their human families because of their routine close contact. You needn’t be slobbered over by a dog to end up with her offending organisms.

So are you more prone to gum disease if you have a dog?
Does the fact that we get bacteria from our dogs' mouths make us more apt to develop gum disease? Says Tufts veterinary dentist Jean Joo, DVM, "No. There’s a big difference between contamination and infection. Contamination just means exposure. But you don’t necessarily get infected. In our everyday lives we’re bathed in bacteria and viruses, but that doesn’t mean we always get sick. You don’t catch a cold just because someone sneezes in your face."

The reason is that many factors play a role in infection, including the strength of the immune system, and, in the case of gum disease, the quality of a person's oral hygiene. Plaque-causing bacteria may make their way into a person's mouth, but if she regularly brushes and flosses, those bacteria will be pulled away from teeth and destroyed. The plaque won't have a chance to harden to tartar, which can begin to compromise the gum juncture at which a tooth is attached to bone.

The bottom line: it’s okay to exchange kisses with your dog That by no means translates to a greater chance of developing gum disease. "I kiss my dog all the time," Dr. Joo says. "The big problem isn’t dental. It’s that he doesn't give me kisses back."

Article Provided by Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care
Reprinted from Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University


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05 May 2017 08:40
Bike Riding: Health and Safety for Dogs 
Taking your dog on a bike ride can be a great way to give her some quick exercise. However, the practice can be dangerous for both dog and owner, and it's definitely not for every dog. Here are some pointers:

- Keep both your hands completely free to steer the bike and operate the brakes. Wrap the leash around your waist or better yet, purchase equipment specially designed for biking with a dog. Generally, this equipment will attach to the bike itself and keep the dog positioned about two feet to the right of your sitting position.
- Maintain as steady a pace as possible. Ideally, your dog should be trotting (not walking because you will be unstable at slow speeds) and not running (you won't have adequate reaction time).
- Practice in a driveway or parking lot before taking your dog on a street. Start with short rides, and gradually increase the distance.
- During the practice session, teach your dog some simple commands that alert her to what she is to do (e.g., whoa to slow down, left to turn left, etc.)
- Be aware that pavement can traumatize dogs' footpads — again, start with short distances to allow the pads to toughen, and check the pads to be sure they are not becoming abraded.
- Excitable dogs that cannot resist chasing cats or other animals are poor candidates for bike exercise.
- Be careful in hot weather — long-haired breeds and brachycephalic breeds can easily become overheated.
- Take water for your dog.
- As your dog gets tired, she will become less alert and more inclined to cause an accident — be careful not to go too far. Remember, when you reach the farthest point from home, the ride is only half over.

Provided by Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care
Reprinted from the Cummings School of Medicine at Tufts
By John Berg, DVM DACVS


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04 Feb 2017 12:32
Springtime Allergies: How They Can Affect Your Pet 
Sniffly, scratchy, wheezy . . . and grumpy. That essentially sums up what spring can mean for a lot of allergy sufferers across the country.
But what about our pets? Can four-legged family members feel the effects of springtime allergens in the same way that we do?
According to Dr. Heather Peikes, VMD, Diplomate ACVD of Pearl Veterinary Partners in New York City and a specialist in pet dermatology, yes!

Q. Are pets affected by springtime allergies in the same way as people?
A. Dr. Heather Peikes: "Animals are susceptible to the same airborne allergens — pollen, trees, grasses, mold and insects — that we are. They’re also affected by similar uncomfortable symptoms, such as a runny nose, watery eyes, itchiness, coughing and disturbed sleep. The most severe conditions usually involve secondary bacterial or yeast infections that can cause extreme itchiness, which often leads to excessive scratching, licking, chewing and rubbing. Some pets get to the point where they’re so uncomfortable that they can’t play or rest properly."
Q. How can I tell if my pet’s watery eyes and habitual scratching are caused by allergies and not by something else?
A. "Dramatic symptoms always require an evaluation by a veterinarian, but there are clues that can point to allergic reactions. Observe your pet’s behavior. Is it normal? Overgrooming, for example, is often dismissed as stress or nerves, when it's really related to allergies. Also, is there a pattern? Do symptoms worsen during the spring or fall, possibly when your own allergies are problematic?
Certain signs warrant an immediate visit to your vet. These include a foul odor (persistent smells may be caused by a buildup of bacteria or yeast on the body, inside the ears, on the lips or in between folds of skin), hair loss and behavioral changes, such as if your pet is simply not playful or not acting like himself."
Q. What can a vet do to treat the symptoms of pet allergies?
A. "First, there are steps that you can take to reduce exposure to allergens and head off reactions. Wipe down your dog or cat — especially the paws — after he comes in from being outside.
To limit the amount of airborne particles that get into your house, take off your own shoes right after you walk through the door. Keep windows closed, bathe your dog or cat with a mild cleanser frequently, and run a HEPA air filter around the clock.

The vet or specialist may recommend the use of antihistamines, but it’s very important to note that these should not be administered without medical supervision. Depending on existing conditions, formulations and dosage, they can be toxic and can even cause death in pets. Never use OTC medications without consulting a vet.

Other prescription treatments include omega-3 fatty acids (for the anti-inflammatory effect) and probiotics. Like some people, pets with allergies may need ‘allergy shots’ or regular treatment with a vaccine. Treatment with topical or oral steroids, or another systemic immunosuppressant, may also be options. Always consult with your veterinarian for the best course of treatment."

Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care


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04 Nov 2016 17:13
Plan Ahead for a Safe Thanksgiving 
If you're planning a Thanksgiving get-together at your home, you'll want to take precautions to keep your cat safe during the festivities. Following are some of the dangers the holiday can pose to your cat.

Cut Flowers, Plants, and Bouquets

Bouquets of cut flowers make beutiful centerpieces and decorations for a Thanksgiving celebration. Unfortunately, many of the most beautiful plants and flowers are also quite deadly to cats. Lilies are a prime example. All parts of any of lilies are toxic to your cat and can be fatal even in very small doses.

Candles and Fireplaces

Curious cats may burn themselves on open flames, such as those found in candles or open fireplaces and they can also pose a fire hazard should your cat accidentally knock over a candle or pull burning embers out of the fireplace.
 

Potpourri

Potpourri contains herbs and oils that may be toxic to your cat if ingested. Keep them out of your cat's reach.

Table Foods

While some cats may do fine with foods from the table, others may be more sensitive and may become ill. There are some foods that are toxic to your cat. Use caution and make sure your guests know what, if anything, they are allowed to feed your cat as well. Be especially cautious with turkey bones.

Strings and Other Linear Foreign Bodies

Strings and other similar types of linear foreign bodies (ribbons, thread, etc.) can cause serious problems for your cat. These items can become caught in the intestinal tract, sometimes causing serious damage. At Thanksgiving-time, special dangers exist in the form of the strings that are commonly found securing your holiday turkey or ham. These items can be especially tempting to your cat because they retain the odor from the food.

Escape

Your Thanksgiving celebration may find you welcoming a group of people into your home. Your cat may take this opportunity to slip out the door unnoticed, or visitors may not realize that your cat is not allowed outdoors. Let your guests know that your cat should remain indoors. In case of escape, make sure your cat is wearing a collar or harness with an identification tag.

Stress/Anxiousness

Cats can be easily stressed or become anxious with changes in routine. Because stress can cause disease for your cat, take steps to minimize the stress for your cat. Make sure your cat has a private area,

Proper Planning Will Save the Day

With a little common sense planning your cat can stay healthy and also enjoy the festivities of Thanksgiving.

Provided by Arlene Wong, Founder & Pet Sitter, Loving Pet Care
Excerpts from PetMD


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24 Sep 2016 10:24
Does Your Dog Like Rummaging Through The Trash? Has His Appetite Increased? 
photoCheck out this great article that was recently published in Your Dog newsletter by the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University and learn how to deal with this unwanted behavior. Click the title above to open the article.

by Arlene Wong of Loving Pet Care


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04 Sep 2016 15:50
Myths Regarding Your Pet’s Diet 
It's fine for dogs and cats to eat each other's food

Myth. While there are a few canned formulas available that meet the needs of both species, most foods are designed specifically for cats or dogs.

Cats require a higher percentage of protein and fat than most dogs and they have specific requirements for additional taurine.

Dogs that eat too much cat food are at risk of weight gain and even pancreatitis. Cats that eat dog food are at risk of weight gain when the food is high in carbohydrates, as well as more likely to develop deficiencies in important amino acids like Taurine.

High protein diets are hard on your pet's kidneys, especially as they age

This myth is a result of poor quality food manufacturers. The truth is that high plant protein diets are hard on your pet's organs; high animal protein diets aren't only healthy for your aging pets, but essential. When choosing a healthy, high protein diet for your pet, avoid any bags that feature corn or soy as a prominent ingredient (or better yet, avoid them all together).

You want named meat meals (like chicken meal or lamb meal) or quality meat as the primary protein source. This is a sureproof way to make sure your pets are eating the diet nature intended.

Table scraps and other "people foods" are bad for your dog and cat

Myth. Most holistically trained veterinarians encourage the practice of feeding "people food" to our pets. Healthy leftovers are an excellent supplement to your companion's regular fare. "There are only two rules with people food for pets:
1) It must be healthy for them: meat, steamed and finely chopped veggies & fruits, baked sweet potato, rice, oatmeal; no junk food; and
2) If you give them some of what you are eating, remember to feed less of their own food so that they don't put on extra pounds."

It's important to note that not all healthy foods for us are healthy for our pets: onions, grapes and raisins can all be toxic to dogs and cats. If you're not positive it's safe, don't feed it.

- Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care, with excerpts 10 Myths about Pet Food and Nutrition by Dr. Jean, Holistic Veterinarian on onlynaturalpet.com


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04 Sep 2016 15:40
Why Do Cats Knock Things Over? 
According to an article by Emma Cueto in Lifestyle Magazine, cats can be funny and weird companions. They like to sleep on our heads, play with boxes and bring home that dead mouse they recently killed. Some like to sprint and jump off of couches and counters and rest in nooks behind toilets and on top of cabinets and some like to knock things over. And while that can be funny sometimes, other it leaves us with a shattered glass vase or a prized porcelain figurine and a mess to clean up.

It's very common for feline hunters, including the cute but deadly house cat, to toy with their prey — and destroying your beloved knickknacks gives them a way to practice this behavior. As Dr. H. Ellen Whiteley explains. "Once a cat learns that knocking something to the floor will bring humans on the double-quick, she may actually do it on purpose to get your attention, particularly if she feels that a meal is long overdue."

In other words, if your cat doesn't think you're paying them enough attention or if you aren't feeding them to their liking, they'll decide that anything that isn't nailed down is fair game.

"Cats are incredibly adept at finding ways to manipulate what they want," says Amy Shojai, a certified animal behavior consultant and the author of several books about cat antics. "which often comes down to: Look at me, feed me, play with me." She explains that since even bad attention is better than being ignored, knocking over objects provides another way for cats to get a reaction out of their human companions.

To prevent accidents, make sure your cat has plenty of appropriate toys around and rotate them in and out of service to keep them exciting and new. And schedule play and exercise time with your cat every day. The combination of boredom and pent up energy will always send cats searching for "trouble."

- Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care, with excerpts from petmd.com and Lifestyle Magazine


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22 Jun 2016 16:14
Your dog’s pals are telling you to get your pet to the doctor 
Perhaps you’ve noticed that dogs with whom your dog has always been friends have recently taken to sniffing his private parts. He seems to be licking them too. You may notice that he even stops in the middle of a walk or play at the dog park to lick.

What's this sudden preoccupation with his private parts? If the interest in your dog’s genitals is new, and its specifically about sniffing, other dogs may be picking up on the scent of some kind of infection that you can’t detect. A dog’s licking can further suggest the presence of an infection. He may be trying to sooth the burning or other unpleasant sensation. A urinary tract infection is high on the list of possibilities. It's best to take your dog to the vet’s office for a check-up.

The vet will probably run some tests and then prescribe an antibiotic to fight whatever is ailing your dog. The frequent licking is probably just making the situation worse.

Sometimes it's easy to dismiss a change in a dog’s habits as a behavioral issue. It's best to have it checked out as delaying may make things worse and more costly. Your dog will be a healthier and happier dog for your efforts.

- Arlene Wong, Loving Pet Care, with excerpts from June 2016 article, Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University


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Pet Health and Nutrition: Healthy Doggie Ice Cream 

15 May 2019 10:40 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

08 May 2019 09:22 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Walmart will see your furry friend now 

07 May 2019 14:03 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Pets Help Older Adults Cope With Health Issues 

07 May 2019 11:56 
Spotlight: Meet Fonzy & Moose 

17 Apr 2019 15:10 
Events: Annual Luncheon Fashion Show for Pets Saddlebrooke HOA 1 - June 5th 

13 Apr 2019 14:51 
Spotlight: Belita - Little Beauty 

10 Apr 2019 17:25 
Adopt Now: Lenny needs a forever home! 

09 Apr 2019 10:43 
Safety: Rattlesnake Safety for Your Pets 

09 Apr 2019 09:51 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

21 Mar 2019 09:28 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

20 Mar 2019 11:00 
Events: MARCH WAGNESS 

07 Mar 2019 15:14 
Events: Howl at the Moon Dog Walk 

07 Mar 2019 14:56 
Spotlight: Puddin' Pie 

20 Jan 2019 16:19 
Urgent Matters: A Local Pinal County Shelter Needs Your HELP! 

16 Jan 2019 15:41 
Pet Health and Nutrition: DOG FOOD RECALL 

15 Jan 2019 11:37 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Dangerous Foods for Dogs 

15 Jan 2019 11:15 
Pet Health and Nutrition: How Owning a Dog Can Improve Your Health 

10 Jan 2019 15:20 
Spotlight: Busy, Busy Jasper 

03 Dec 2018 09:53 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALLS 

03 Dec 2018 09:42 
Safety: Pet Safety during Holidays 

14 Nov 2018 10:16 
Spotlight: Happiness Is 

13 Nov 2018 08:08 
Spotlight: The Tales of Two Doggies 

13 Nov 2018 07:56 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

31 Oct 2018 16:16 
Safety: Your Dog Versus a Coyote 

27 Oct 2018 13:49 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

25 Oct 2018 18:52 
Spotlight: Our Sweet Social Snowflake 

09 Oct 2018 08:46 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Shedding Concerns 

28 Sep 2018 13:41 
Lost and Found: FOUND - Does anyone recognize me? 

19 Sep 2018 10:41 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Tips For Living With A Blind Or Visually Impaired Pet 

19 Sep 2018 09:46 
Safety: Living With Coyotes 

27 Aug 2018 09:34 
Events: Cowboy Cookout "fur" Critters 

08 Aug 2018 13:28 
Spotlight: Our Sweet Social Snowflake 

07 Aug 2018 10:07 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

07 Aug 2018 09:53 
Safety: The Heartbreak of a Lost or Missing Pet 

30 Jul 2018 10:11 
Safety: Tips To Keep Your Pets Safe 

26 Jun 2018 09:30 
Safety: GPS Tracking Devices for Cats and Dogs 

10 Jun 2018 10:48 
Pet Health and Nutrition: Dealing with Pet Loss 

06 Jun 2018 16:14 
Spotlight: Sophie's Christmas Present 

24 May 2018 10:28 
Safety: DOG FOOD RECALL 

24 May 2018 10:23 
Urgent Matters: Forster Family Needed for Mica 

24 May 2018 10:12 
Adopt Now: Maggie Needs A Home Of Her Own 

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SaddleBrooke Pet Rescue Network 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisher"Until there are none, save one." The Network's Seniors4Seniors Program places senior pets with senior citizens. We pay half the adoption fee; you provide the love! Senior pets can be as young as ... read RSS feed item

PetFinder 
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Tucson Cold Wet Noses 
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Loving Pet Care 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherWe are SBR residents and experienced pet sitters providing loving care for pets here in Saddlebrooke Ranch since 2011. For more information, please visit our website by clicking Loving Pet Care.

Camp Bow Wow, Catalina, AZ 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherCamp Bow Wow® is the leading pet care franchise and is all about Happy Healthy Pets and Happy Healthy People. Doggie Day Care • Boarding • Grooming • Dog Training.

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Le Dogue Mobile Grooming Service 
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Pet Grooming by Dani 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherCall Dani at 520-825-9336. Located at 16302 N Oracle Road in Catalina.

Poochini's Pet Grooming 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherPoochini's mission is, first and foremost, to look after your pet's complete comfort, health and well-being during the grooming process.

Pet Art Portraits by LLGorman 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherPet Art Portraits by LL Gorman captures your pet's personality with impressionistic photography on canvas with eighty year light fastness protection. Gallery wrapped, ready to hang.

Mesquite Veterinary Hospital 
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Homeward Bound Veterinary Services 
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Veterinary Specialty Center of Tucson 
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Ina Road Animal Hospital 
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Pusch Ridge Pet Clinic 
photoenfeedia RSS feed publisherThe Pusch Ridge Pet Clinic, founded in 2000, has been providing the northwest Tucson community and beyond with the best possible veterinary care for its furry friends.



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